Art Journals

Painting on Mylar

Bob passed on a long roll of Mylar to me, so I shared it in Muse Group to see what we could do with it. Here’s a couple variations.

It’s shiny stuff! Highly reflective. Look into it and it becomes a fun-house mirror. Paint with acrylics on it and they flow unheeded. Not so easy to photograph, but I had to share the discoveries here anyway. (Meanwhile my husband has started a new series photographing Mylar in stunning ways!)

butterfly

Acrylic on mylar on painted paper with painted plaster medallion

Duck! Put your head down!  The slings are loaded with outrageous fortunes.

You may want to take cover for a while,

But keep an eye open for the next opportunity. The nectar will be waiting.

(But then, maybe it’s a gentle rain of the spring kind, full of golden glints and distant blue skies. Not a time to be blue.)

Painting with acrylics on Mylar, which has a mirror-like surface, is fun! I dripped and squirted fluid acrylic inks and tipped the board and watched them flow and do their own thing. It turned out to be sort of a butterfly shape, so I cut it out, painted a background on paper and collaged it on. The “medallion” was made of plaster of paris, dried and painted to look like a stone. The “slings” and “arrows” are more mylar and a plastic scraper dipped in paint.

mylargrid

Once again, really hard to photograph! But here I folded the Mylar in a grid and dripped the inks on, spritzing with water to get them to flow and settle, coaxing them into spaces where I wanted them. When I glued it onto the paper I left it loose so that the squares would reflect the light in many ways. The students folded the Mylar in different ways to get stunning effects!

Workshops This Spring!

It’s a busy spring season coming up, and I’ll be doing what I enjoy most – sharing approaches to painting and spreading my own creative wings with like-minded people! Hope you can join me.

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For more information about these workshops and to register visit my website!

No Need to Panic

This week we borrowed an idea from San Francisco magazine, a glossy well designed monthly with far out fashions and architecture and city culture. The concept: take a picture of interest, crop it off and continue the image with lines that vector off on white space, connecting with other images/designs. In order to have room to honor the white space, we folded 30″ wide paper accordian style into the usual 10 X 11″ size which can be put in the ring binder.

noneedtopanic

Tri-fold, opens on the left

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No need to panic. Just follow the lines. But which ones?

The preferred arrangement is best, they say. 

Seek the strong buttress, the steady beam to hold things up.

But ah! the meandering line is the one to follow for the unexpected and novel delights.

In any event, there’s no need to panic. Follow the line up to the roof and enjoy the view.

Just don’t jump.

The directionality of lines is a powerful force, both in design and as a metaphor for life.  This lesson pushed us all into and through uncomfortable places as we randomly sought design solutions. When these words “no need to panic” appeared on the pieces I was cutting out, I took the advise to relax and maybe trust a bit more in all that white space. There’s so much of it, but it seems to be holding up it’s part of the picture. Who would have thought?

Take a tip from these three

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Take a tip from these three, tripping the spring fandango

Get up and make some tracks in the soft wet earth or high on the wire

Join the avian gang twittering the day away

They won’t save those seeds for you

But they’ll let you fill their feeder

Take your lunch under their tree

Get all quiet and munch

Take a tip or two or three from these spring warblers

We got kind of stamp-happy this week with our acrylics and all kinds of stamping things: home-made, found, and purchased. At one point in Muse Group I went around and took some pictures. It is such a catalyst for creative work to see the materials all spread out and people diving in and making colorful marks and seeing the patterns evolving!

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When I saw what was happening on my paper palette (on the left) I decided to “steal” the idea from myself! I slathered on the paint and used a homemade soft linoleum stamp and cut out some paper I’d already stamped on.

stamping5 For these birds I used a hand-carved stamp made in India and then cut out the shapes to use in the painting above, adding more color later.

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Mary Ellen was rolling acrylic paint onto rubber shelf liner which you can find at the hardware store, then printing with it!

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Here Pat is making some wonderful collage paper for later use. Actually many of us wished we could have this design in a set of placemats!

stamping1 Experiment! Experiment! Experiment! It all made my creative tail wag! Carole’s were spread all over.

Early Spring Musings

Sometimes I just want to look at the blossoms and not remember the storms that brought us here. Look at the green and the lacy morning dew and imagine that this world is mine, as is, right now. Not just in process and needing to be weeded. Not because it all will soon enough disappear, torched by summer’s draught. But just because it is right now. . .mine.

Lookatthefruit

acrylic textures (molding pastes), acrylic inks and collage on w/c paper, 10 X 11″

It is apple blossom season here in Sonoma County. You don’t want to blink and miss it! You don’t want to miss the butterflies fluttering through the garden, drinking apple blossom nectar, mating, and laying eggs on the pipevine. Gardening is a great excuse to be outside with hands in the dirt, and art making gravitates always to these spring colors and forms.

In Muse group we were playing with a wide variety of texture making tools and many of the acrylic mediums now on the market, from molding paste and crackle paste to gels with clear flakes and pumice. You could spend a fortune in the art store gathering up the various mediums to get texture. It’s what happens when you put fluid paint over them that excites me.

I’ll be teaching a weekend mixed media workshop June 24 and 25 where we’ll be using textures like these to achieve the light casting sparkle of Patina!  For more information and to register please visit my website.

Looking at my life. . .with Rumi

lookingatmylifeacrylic and tissue paper, screen, lacy rice paper collage on w/c paper 10 X 11″

Inspired by a poem of Rumi and an interest in playing with translucent papers in some way, I folded tissure paper accordian style and wrote a line of Rumi’s poem on each fold, then secured it in a pouch. Oh, just a lot of fun playing with materials on a lovely rainy spring equinox day with my delightful Muse sisters.

Citrasolv art

Citrasolv cleaner “melts” the clay based inks of National Geographics in the most stunning way. I keep circling back to the Citrasolv collage lesson, which has to be started outside when the weather is warm and not windy. . .like last Monday.

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National Geo papers collaged on w/c paper, 10 X 11″

Are you caught, tangled , running into hidden snares everywhere? Tread carefully. Watch your step, or when you fly, land carefully.  This life thing is tricky, at times sticky. It takes a lot of maneuvering to get yourself free once entangled.

So why not become the one who unties the knots, releases the locks, opens the door and gets to say “You’re free now. Go for it!”

If you want to try making these papers yourself, there are lots of how-to videos online. My favorite papers are the ones that have some picture peaking through, like the guy in blue above. And sometimes a page is so gorgeous by itself that you wish you’d painted it! You can also use the Citrasolv concentrate to wipe off spots of ink, using a stencil or a brush.

See more examples of my Citrasolv art on this blog.