Art Journals

Give it a Name

As soon as you see the face, there’s always a name waiting for it. This one became Oscar.

oscar

inks and gesso on w/c paper, 10 X 11″

I was doing a demonstration of expressive painting with ink droppers, gesso, and scraper tools for a new private student. The next day this fellow in the wonderful cossack hat winked at me. All I had to do was paint in the eye, give him some teeth, and name him.

I hesitated at first. I had to reassure myself that it was OK to be so foolish. Surely I’m a more serious sort of artist than that. Perhaps I’ve been sketching so many people that I just can’t stop? But then perhaps you’ve have noticed that I’m having too much fun lately to stop it.

Here’s another one though, where maybe one can see more serious intent. . .

anarray

acrylic molding paste, textured foil collage, acrylic paint and gold leaf flecks

Embossing foil, collaging with metallic flakes and juxtaposing cool greens/blues and burnt orange are some of the techniques I’ll be sharing in the “Patina” workshop coming up next weekend at the Sebastopol Center for the Arts. At this writing there is still time to register for the last spot. For more info and to register visit my website. And by the way, there’s good air conditioning in the painting studio there!!

While the poor little studio air conditioner here tries to help me survive the 100 degree heat outside, these lovely blue squares are the tinkling ice cubes in the glass!

 

Mixed Media workshop coming up!

On June 24 and 25 I’ll be teaching a workshop on one of my favorite techniques – achieving the look of patina in experimental mixed media painting. At the moment my studio is strewn with my own experiments and ideas I want to share. There are a couple spaces left in the workshop at this writing. Let me know if you’re interested and available to come join us!

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For more information and to register visit my website!

Rest, Retirement, Gardens

Sometimes I have to remind myself that we have gardens for more than weeding. In other words, it’s OK to simply sit outside and enjoy.

rest

inks, gesso, collage on w/c paper, 10 X 11″

Time for rest, on a cushion in the garden, draped with ferns and fragrant blooms, a pair of cooing doves and a lap full of purring cat. The weeds can wait another day. The plans for tomorrow, the latest world news, the emails, all of it can wait.

For now there’s those cushions. If you don’t try them out a bit each day, the cats soon will and your throne of rest will be usurped. Then how will all those lovely garden idles find their way into the art? So take a rest – it needn’t be for long.

This piece was actually a demo I did for a private art party/workshop held in my studio a couple weekends ago, something I offer from time to time with great delight! We had lunch under the trees on the patio and I didn’t pull a single weed!

retirement

Actually I was contemplating my husband who just retired June 2 and is learning to occupy a lounge chair outside while reading. At least he tried it for a couple days before getting all busy with his art again.

matilija

My own strategy for sitting still in the garden is to do a quick sketch. For me that counts as rest, even though I find it quite energizing.  But then I’m not retired, exactly. . .

Geology

My latest experiments in the art laboratory explore the territory of “patina”. They are usually a response to the query “I wonder what would happen if. . .” and in this case. . .if I wet the watercolor paper and paint into it with iridescent paints. The metallic particles drop out of solution on the wet surface causing spontaneous “events”.

geology

Lumiere’s Halo Blue Gold and Metallic Bronze and Golden’s Iridescent Bright Gold acrylics and Higgen’s Black India ink on w/c paper (with plaster of paris medallion)

The frustrating thing about these patina paintings is the difficulty in photographing the reflective paints, so you’ll have to use your imagination because they’ve gone flat in this image. The lovely blue is actually the blue portion of the Blue Gold as the gold is left behind by the water.

Imagine the treasures that surface on the trails we walk. Then again imagine the ones packed within the earth’s core. The restless imagination becomes a geologist digging deeper into that landscape, more wondrous and bizarre, that cannot be seen with mere eyes.

And then it surfaces again, to the just-enough-loveliness of everyday to sweeten this perplexing gift of life.

I’ll be teaching a new version of Experimental Mixed Media Painting: “Patina” at Sebastopol Center for the Arts on June 24 and 25. There’s still a couple spaces if you’re interested! For more information visit my website.

 

Cat Woman

There are no more Monday Muse Group sessions until September, but this Muse-ing is a habit which continues. I’m going to take this time to redo some of the lessons and explore them further.

So I pulled out a piece of Mylar I had played around with and gotten some interesting blending of colors, and found the beginnings of Cat Woman. After some cutting and pasting and painting, here’s what came of it/her.

catwoman

Cat Woman stares into the mists of time. The days and hours are not relevant, nor the passage of one afternoon. She knows these are all products of a restless mind. She seeks the swirling mists of eons and cares not about presidential fumbling through this calendar year. Her heart is steady, her eyes focused on some ineffable horizon, her ears tuned to earth murmurs others cannot hear. Ancient though she is, still she holds in her fur and bones a newborn’s innocence and wonder.

It’s good to have a Cat Woman in mind. She’s got her priorities straight.

I miss doing the mixed media muse art in the group, but also know that many of you are continuing to explore these inner art realms on your own and remain in companionship with all of us.

The Monday Afternoon Muse Group will resume with a 6-week session September 18-October 23 and registration for this has already started. For more information and to reserve a spot visit my website.

Skeeter

When we were making collage papers in Muse Group by splattering National Geographics with Citrasolv concentrate, a spell binding creature appeared on a page. That was the impetus for this piece, combining ink, collage and acrylic. See if you can tell which material is which, or just take a look and let the creature weave its spell on you.

skeeter2

If I were a s’keeter the world might look like this, from second to second cracked open, taken apart and then put back together all new. I’d have to keep figuring it out, like a person with amnesia or short term memory loss. 

Would that really be so bad, every second a new world? or richly phantasmagoric.

Painting on Mylar

Bob passed on a long roll of Mylar to me, so I shared it in Muse Group to see what we could do with it. Here’s a couple variations.

It’s shiny stuff! Highly reflective. Look into it and it becomes a fun-house mirror. Paint with acrylics on it and they flow unheeded. Not so easy to photograph, but I had to share the discoveries here anyway. (Meanwhile my husband has started a new series photographing Mylar in stunning ways!)

butterfly

Acrylic on mylar on painted paper with painted plaster medallion

Duck! Put your head down!  The slings are loaded with outrageous fortunes.

You may want to take cover for a while,

But keep an eye open for the next opportunity. The nectar will be waiting.

(But then, maybe it’s a gentle rain of the spring kind, full of golden glints and distant blue skies. Not a time to be blue.)

Painting with acrylics on Mylar, which has a mirror-like surface, is fun! I dripped and squirted fluid acrylic inks and tipped the board and watched them flow and do their own thing. It turned out to be sort of a butterfly shape, so I cut it out, painted a background on paper and collaged it on. The “medallion” was made of plaster of paris, dried and painted to look like a stone. The “slings” and “arrows” are more mylar and a plastic scraper dipped in paint.

mylargrid

Once again, really hard to photograph! But here I folded the Mylar in a grid and dripped the inks on, spritzing with water to get them to flow and settle, coaxing them into spaces where I wanted them. When I glued it onto the paper I left it loose so that the squares would reflect the light in many ways. The students folded the Mylar in different ways to get stunning effects!