pouring medium

Fire Flow

firepourDemo for Monday Muse Group: acrylic, Pouring Medium, collage (paper, netting, “medallion skins”)

Such beauty, red, color of sunset, of ripe apples, of rosy cheeks and

Color of flames blowing this way, color of monster chewing up homes, melting down metals and tossing cars like those evil midwestern twisters.

And that Hollywood Oscars-night glow on my horizon. Dumbfounding.

A couple of days after the Tubbs fire (since anointed as the most destructive fire in California’s history) began and while it was still raging on, I tried painting the horizon in flames in the night sky as I viewed it from our living room window on that night of October 8. It didn’t work. There was no way to paint it “on purpose” because this fire was the essence of random. Add to that rampant, unconstrained and unpredictable.

Those same adjectives could be used for acrylic pouring medium which is formulated to make acrylic paints flow and level out and keep moving as you tip and turn the paper, and to keep moving until they dry, which takes a while. Pouring Medium is the name for the Liquitex brand, but Golden has their own version called GAC 800. Mix a few drops of fluid acrylic paint with the medium and you’re ready to pour, either onto your painting surface (paper here) or onto plastic in order to make “skins”, or as I like to call the more circular pools, “medallions”. Here are some of the other medallions I made.

medallionsWhen they’re dry, after a day or so, you peel them up and use them as collage pieces. The one on the lower left was made by marbling with a stick and tipping the surface. The others were made on a level surface with pouring and dropping the paint, all mixed with pouring medium.

medallions2

These involved more tipping of the surface to cause more random occurrences as in the painting at the top. You never know what’s going to happen. . . like that fire.

I’ll be teaching “medallions” and other mixed media techniques in the upcoming workshop. Contact me if you’re interested!

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Pouring a Volcano

pour

acrylic inks in pouring medium on w/c paper, 10 X 11″

Poured acrylic paint brings to mind that streaming molten lava coming down volcanos in rivulets.  Working with it feels about as controllable as a volcanic eruption as well!  This was the first piece I was able to do without escaping rivers of acrylic running off the surface and pooling in unwanted areas.  A few drops of (each color) acrylic ink mixed with a generous amount of Liquitex pouring medium was poured onto the uncoated paper and tilted in different directions to get those interesting incidents. The colors were poured next to each other so that they “knit” together and then made spontaneous patterns. Each time a rivulet started I filled in the space with more of the fluid paint.  I can’t imagine trying to do this large without a retinue of helpers.

That’s what Jonas Gerard does.  He has a person at each corner of the large painting to help with the tilting while he pours.  It’s a fun video to watch.

Golden Paints has their own versions of pouring mediums: