reportage

Latino Community Event

Last night I attended an event for the Latino Community to share experiences of the firestorms last October. KRCB in conjunction with KBBF were the hosts and there was dinner and entertainment. It was a great opportunity to listen to and sketch “Fire Stories”.

trioOrion

Trio Orion was a perfect way to warm up the crowd. I learned that KBBF radio provided the only translation of fire disaster information to the Spanish speaking community that was experiencing the same terror and uncertainty as the rest of Santa Rosa.

pattyginochio_1

Patty Ginochio, of Ginochio’s Kitchen in Bodega Bay talked about the throngs of fire evacuees that filled the roads and later the beaches in the wake of the fires. Many of them were Spanish speakers who were afraid to go to the shelters closer to Santa Rosa because they feared deportation. But she also spoke of the overwhelming support provided them by the community in the days that followed.

irma

Irma Garcia spoke eloquently about the need for government and other agencies to be better prepared to understand and respond to the needs of the Latino community that works so hard and makes such a large contribution to our county.

threestories_3

Some middle school girls read their poems about the fire. And then individuals shared their anxiety the night of the fires and their difficulty coming to terms with their post-fire lives.

My pen and brush were moving like mad to try to record all this while my heart filled with compassion for these folks. I hope we all do a better job of watching out for all the people in our community whenever the next disaster appears, regardless of citizenship, language or economic status.

If you think you’d like to sketch fire stories like these please join us on Saturday Oct 6 at the Shiloh Park Wildfire Anniversary Event: Community Healing Together. And please sign up at the Meet Up site where there’s more information, and so we know you’re coming.

Advertisements

Kevin’s house

It all started with the article in the Press Democrat showing Bettina and Carole and I sketching out on the streets of Coffey Park, that famously unfortunate neighborhood of fleeing souls that lost 1200 homes in one night in last October’s firestorm in Santa Rosa, CA.

Sasha saw the article and contacted us to see if we could do a similar “fire story sketch” of  Kevin’s (her fiance) home that burned that night.  The idea was to try to do something showing the passage of time.

sashashome2

I started by sketching what was the present moment of the new home coming up on a street which was busy with construction.

Of all the neighborhoods in Santa Rosa that burned in that fire, Coffey Park is way ahead in efforts to rebuild. You can see the Coffey Strong signs everywhere that express a kind of neighborhood “united we stand” sentiment that has proved to be so vital to the spirit of healing and renewal.

kevinsmotorcycle

Sasha wanted another sketch showing the possession that Kevin was the most distressed to lose in the fire – his shiny new red motorcycle! Luckily she had a photo of the motorcycle before and after, as well as a before the fire photo of the house. I was able to combine all three in this rendering.

kevinandsasha

Sasha invited me to come after work to see how the house was coming along, meet Kevin, give them the sketches, and watch the Coffey Strong neighbors greeting each other for their “walk the neighborhood” and potluck gathering.  There were smiles and hugs and picture taking and exchanges of information about how the construction is going, decisions that are being made, etc. It felt like the kind of survivor’s club I’d want to be a member of.

kevinshouse

Kevin and Sasha are told the house will be finished by Christmas. I sure hope Kevin has a motorcycle under the tree!

Corpse Flower and other S.F. Wonders

My recent days in San Francisco were almost perfectly timed to view the monstrously gorgeous Corpse Flower in bloom at the Conservatory of Flowers, along with other botanical wonders. The flower is actually taller than me and I’m 5’9′!

corpse

Luckily I missed out on the rotting flesh smell.  But I also missed seeing the full opening to all the little flowers in the base!

The environment inside the Conservatory is mostly steamy and tropical. My glasses misted up as soon as I walked in. And each room is like walking into an eerie land of alien looking plants.

lillies2

These pond lilies are large enough to hold the weight of a human! And the pitcher plants were there in all sizes and colors, looking like the hiding place for fairies in an enchanted garden. One can certainly imagine that animation artists and science fiction writers might get their ideas from such a collection.

 

pitcher2

“Pitcher plants with matching beetle” Sketching botanicals was such a lovely break from drawing humans-in-motion and complicated city scenes.

Fillmorest

One of my days was spent alone in the city wandering, or “flaneusing”. The first plan was to stroll along the Marina, but the wind drove me south into the Cow Hollow neighborhood where I perched for a few minutes to recover.

causwells

All the above sketches are in my 7 X 5″ w/c book, fountain pen and w/c

It was brunchtime then and I was seated at Causwells in the corner where I had an excellent vantage point for people sketching. It’s unavoidable to make up stories about people you are sketching, especially when you hear little snatches of conversation!

birdman

Next stop.  . .the Palace of Fine Arts, where I’ve sketched before. With my stomach full and my feet tired and the wind blowing pretty hard I didn’t really want to tackle sketching the complex Greco-Roman style Rotunda and colonnades, beautiful though they are. As I entered the central rotunda I found shelter from the wind and this scene.

Johnny from Liverpool was serenading the pigeons while feeding them. He was in a narrow band of shade and I didn’t want to disturb him or the birds and sat a distance off, where I could only see his outline (hence the scribbly start). He looked friendly though, and was open to me sitting next to him. Soon the bride showed up, posing for a wedding picture along with at least five different brides and grooms I saw in the hour or so I was there.

A Sol 2 Sol talk and Pop up Show

After the climate march I stayed in the city for a couple more days of city wandering/sketching, then went home (to Sebastopol).

A couple days later I returned to S.F. to do some more! The actual Global Climate Action Summit was going on at the Moscone Center, with Governor Brown and Al Gore and 4500 delegates from around the world. I couldn’t get into the actual summit, but wanted to dip my toe in the action. So I met some other sketchers in the Yerba Buena gardens across from Moscone Center. A group of marchers were congregating in front of the Contemporary Jewish Museum across the street.

Loretta Bolden2

I honestly didn’t know what people and climate stories I would find as I walked into a group of people dressed in yellow t-shirts who were chanting and then breaking for lunch. The group was Sol 2 Sol, participating in the “It Takes Roots Solidarity to Solutions Week to spotlight frontline community solutions to the interlinked economic, democratic and climate crises currently threatening humanity.” They were there ” To discuss place-based solutions that serve to simultaneously decarbonize, detoxify, demilitarize and democratize our economy through critical strategies such as Indigenous land rights, food sovereignty, zero waste, public transportation, ecosystem restoration, universal healthcare, worker rights, housing rights, racial and gender justice, and economic relocalization.” That sure covers a lot of ground!

When I approached Loretta I didn’t know any of this, just that she looked like someone I would like to meet and who probably had her own interesting story to tell.

LorettaBolden_Susancornelis

She had come all the way from Cherokee, N.C. (Geeze I hope they’re OK with Florence still on the rampage!) to support her people. I learned that it is not a reservation but part of the Qualla Boundary, a term I had not heard before which signifies that it was purchased by the tribe in the 1870s and subsequently placed under federal protection.

Loretta of course had concerns about threats to the health of their lands, but was impressed also by wider climate changes. Her group had toured Santa Rosa just the week before to see the devastation wrought by our Tubbs fire! It was moving to hear her reaction as she recounted what she had learned on that tour about the climate-wrought disaster in my own community!

Needless to say I found it difficult to sketch the portrait of this fascinating lady out in the bright sun while also interviewing her and trying to make notes of what she said! Bless her heart for hanging in there with  me!

That evening we hung a pop-up show at the Contemporary Jewish Museum of about 200 climate story portrait sketches by urban sketchers.

climatesketchshow

What started as just an interesting idea by our fearless leader Laurie Wigham turned in one month into a project of great interest not only to the sketchers in the Bay Area but to so many of the participants in the climate summit-related efforts who were anxious to have their stories heard and and recorded.

climatesketchshow2

The show has been taken down now, but you can see the sketches on the SketchingClimateStories website! And if you’d like to get involved in this form of story-telling sketching, and you live in the Bay Area, please let me know and I’ll try to get you connected.

ImpactofClimateChangeCA2_SusanCornelisThe next morning I attended another event about “The Impact of Climate Change on California” at City College, which was another opportunity for people to share their experiences. I had pictured a town hall meeting type event where I would sit discreetly on the side, but it was a small classroom with several organizers and a handful of participants seated in a circle including us four sketchers.

ImpactofClimateChangeCA_SusanCornelis

With respect for those who do not speak English, everything was translated into Spanish. The meeting was led in by a facilitator from the group Sustaining All Life, an international grassroots organization working to end climate change within the context of ending all divisions among people.

ImpactofClimateChangeCA3_SusanCornelis

I enjoyed participating in the personal sharing exercises, which gave me the opportunity to talk about our community’s trauma with the firestorms. It also made the reportage efforts more challenging as I crossed the line from reporter to participant.

Seated to my right was Ruying, an electrical engineer/climate scientist and Summit delegate from Beijing, China, who was hoping to gain some insight into the experience of Californians. She spoke with enthusiasm about the joint efforts of China and California in dealing with climate change. I suspect that this meeting was eye opener for her!

More Climate Stories

I just got home from S.F. last night after a pretty exciting week of activities around the Global Climate Action Summit. Time to get caught up with some posting.

Back to last Saturday’s Rise for Climate, Jobs, and Justice march to Civic Center Plaza. My first sketch when I arrived was a hurried one of Berkeley students painting design outlines for the colorful circles on the streets in front of City Hall.

berkeleystudents

And here’s some more of my climate story sketches, this one done from the table under the tents, where interested marchers were pulled in by the colorful sketches they saw and a chance to tell their own story.

girlfromHawaii_SusanCornelis

Lia is from Hawaii and a student of environmental studies in San Francisco. She spoke of the fragility of the eco system in Hawaii and her feeling that S.F. was a great place to get involved because of its progressiveness.

The hardest thing in a quick 10 minute portrait is to get the age right. It seems I’m always making younger people look older (as in this one), and older people younger.

LiaPosatiere-By-SusanCornelis

Kallan_SusanCornelis

This lovely environmentalist is starting young. Kallan is 14 and had come from her home in Annapolis (I assume she meant Maryland) because she feels so strongly about the issues of climate change. She has already been involved in MotherEarthProject, Parachutes For The Planet, circular works of art that are a metaphor for bringing the world back to a safe place, and are used to get communities to commit to implement sustainable activities.

Kallan-By-SusanCornelis

 

She was dressed as a butterfly! A gentleman who was watching me sketch was very disconcerted that I’d made her look older and told me I should fix it! Since that was impossible, I ignored him and told Kallan that I’d made her look more mature because she is clearly an “old soul”, which is what I believe. I mean to have such a clear purpose at the age of 14. . .! Inspiring.

school teacher

I was on a run of young women! Gail Gallagher is a brand new teacher of 9th grade biology. “It’s a big moment,” she said, “and I want to be a part of it. We need to get the momentum back.”

That’s the rest of the sketches I was able to do at the march event. I didn’t actually march myself but was at the Civic Center Plaza before and after. There were tree people on stilts and native dancers that rattled as they walked and and tossed their magnificent feather headresses. There were songs and other music and around 4 pm I just walked around enjoying the circle designs.

meincircle

 

circle

tuba

See more Climate Story Sketches on our website.

Next: More climate activities, sketches and a pop up art show at the Contemporary Jewish Museum!

Sketching Climate Stories

Next weekend I’ll be participating in “Sketching Climate Stories” at the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco. The Bay Area urban sketching groups are joining together to document the  Climate Summit and the people who are coming to it. We’ll be doing portraits in pictures and words, telling the stories of how individuals and their communities have been affected by climate change—and how they’re working on solutions.

2 Interview/sketch pieces, 8.5X11″, pen, water soluble pencil, w/c on w/c paper

So I got together with my sketch buddies this week to practice interviewing and sketching in pairs. The three of us had lots to relate about how Global Warming is affecting our community here in the post-Tubbs fire era.

Bettina’s comment: “The threat of fire was always more theoretical before . .now the danger can’t be ignored. It’s right on our doorstep!” could have been made by just about anyone here in the Santa Rosa and other areas. And when asked what she is working on, Carole responded that she is using her art to “bring awareness to social issues like Climate Change”.

And if you’re looking for ways to do the same, read on here.

We’ll be starting at the Rise for Climate march on Sunday and dropping in on different events and actions during the week. We have applied for press credentials to do sketch reportage of the GCAS events in the Moscone Center.

The main groups involved are the SF Bay Area Urban Sketchers, a chapter of the international Urban Sketchers organization, with 220 chapters around the world, and SF Sketchers, a San Francisco-based meetup group with nearly 3,000 members.

We will be posting our sketches online in the blog SketchingClimateStories.org (currently under construction), a Facebook group, Sketching Climate Stories and on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #sketchingclimatestories.

The sketches themselves will be shown at several locations during the week, including a popup show at the Contemporary Jewish Museum on their Green Thursday evening. We are planning a larger show of all the sketches after the Summit and are considering ways that the climate stories could evolve into a long-term project, documenting the effects of climate change on frontline communities. (I would add here, that one of the frontline communities will be here in Sonoma County where we’ll be commemorating the first anniversary of the Oct 2018 firestorms this year with events by many local groups.)

Here are Inks to currently scheduled events (this will change as more events are added)

Practice session at Arch Art Supplies, September 1

Reportage sketching at the march on September 8

Popup show of the sketches at the Contemporary Jewish Museum on Green Thursday, September 13

It’s all pretty exciting and constantly evolving. Feel free to contact me if you wonder how you can get involved, either in the S.F. event or in October for our Sonoma Co. events.

 

Festival of the Sea

You could get a pirate tattoo. watch sail raising, learn knot tying, splicing, worming and parceling, and listen to folk songs from around the world on the pier stages. It was the Festival of the Sea on Saturday at the Hyde St. Pier on Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco. Or you could join the Urban Sketchers meet up and enjoy all of the above while sketching!

festivalofsea1

Fountain pen and watercolor in handmade sketchbook 7.5X11″

This was the most popular sketch subject. The raising of the sails on the C.A. Thayer schooner with all that sail flapping the wind and the crew suspended on the boom and cables way above the bay waters.

festivalofsea2

And such sweet and lively fiddle music from this pair, Adrianna Ciccone and Colin Cotter

festivalofsea3

I had heard the Brass Farthing sing their drinking songs at the Much Ado About Sebastopol Fair and was delighted to hear them again here. Their songs are bawdy, but not so terribly. The young son of one of them was seated next to us. It was a short set so I was drawing like crazy. Apologies to the one or two I couldn’t fit in and as always, the not quite likenesses I come up with!

festivalofsea5

I always try to show my sketches to the musicians if I can. This fellow found me later to take a peak and I asked for a picture.

festivalofsea4

There was just a bit of time left til we headed home so I picked a simple subject, a row boat on the beach which was enjoyed by children and adults in consecutive waves in the 20 minutes I sketched around them! I was too tired at that point to attempt to put the people in!