Mylar painting

Cat Woman

There are no more Monday Muse Group sessions until September, but this Muse-ing is a habit which continues. I’m going to take this time to redo some of the lessons and explore them further.

So I pulled out a piece of Mylar I had played around with and gotten some interesting blending of colors, and found the beginnings of Cat Woman. After some cutting and pasting and painting, here’s what came of it/her.

catwoman

Cat Woman stares into the mists of time. The days and hours are not relevant, nor the passage of one afternoon. She knows these are all products of a restless mind. She seeks the swirling mists of eons and cares not about presidential fumbling through this calendar year. Her heart is steady, her eyes focused on some ineffable horizon, her ears tuned to earth murmurs others cannot hear. Ancient though she is, still she holds in her fur and bones a newborn’s innocence and wonder.

It’s good to have a Cat Woman in mind. She’s got her priorities straight.

I miss doing the mixed media muse art in the group, but also know that many of you are continuing to explore these inner art realms on your own and remain in companionship with all of us.

The Monday Afternoon Muse Group will resume with a 6-week session September 18-October 23 and registration for this has already started. For more information and to reserve a spot visit my website.

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Painting on Mylar

Bob passed on a long roll of Mylar to me, so I shared it in Muse Group to see what we could do with it. Here’s a couple variations.

It’s shiny stuff! Highly reflective. Look into it and it becomes a fun-house mirror. Paint with acrylics on it and they flow unheeded. Not so easy to photograph, but I had to share the discoveries here anyway. (Meanwhile my husband has started a new series photographing Mylar in stunning ways!)

butterfly

Acrylic on mylar on painted paper with painted plaster medallion

Duck! Put your head down!  The slings are loaded with outrageous fortunes.

You may want to take cover for a while,

But keep an eye open for the next opportunity. The nectar will be waiting.

(But then, maybe it’s a gentle rain of the spring kind, full of golden glints and distant blue skies. Not a time to be blue.)

Painting with acrylics on Mylar, which has a mirror-like surface, is fun! I dripped and squirted fluid acrylic inks and tipped the board and watched them flow and do their own thing. It turned out to be sort of a butterfly shape, so I cut it out, painted a background on paper and collaged it on. The “medallion” was made of plaster of paris, dried and painted to look like a stone. The “slings” and “arrows” are more mylar and a plastic scraper dipped in paint.

mylargrid

Once again, really hard to photograph! But here I folded the Mylar in a grid and dripped the inks on, spritzing with water to get them to flow and settle, coaxing them into spaces where I wanted them. When I glued it onto the paper I left it loose so that the squares would reflect the light in many ways. The students folded the Mylar in different ways to get stunning effects!