architecture inspired art

No Need to Panic

This week we borrowed an idea from San Francisco magazine, a glossy well designed monthly with far out fashions and architecture and city culture. The concept: take a picture of interest, crop it off and continue the image with lines that vector off on white space, connecting with other images/designs. In order to have room to honor the white space, we folded 30″ wide paper accordian style into the usual 10 X 11″ size which can be put in the ring binder.

noneedtopanic

Tri-fold, opens on the left

noneedtopanic2

No need to panic. Just follow the lines. But which ones?

The preferred arrangement is best, they say. 

Seek the strong buttress, the steady beam to hold things up.

But ah! the meandering line is the one to follow for the unexpected and novel delights.

In any event, there’s no need to panic. Follow the line up to the roof and enjoy the view.

Just don’t jump.

The directionality of lines is a powerful force, both in design and as a metaphor for life.  This lesson pushed us all into and through uncomfortable places as we randomly sought design solutions. When these words “no need to panic” appeared on the pieces I was cutting out, I took the advise to relax and maybe trust a bit more in all that white space. There’s so much of it, but it seems to be holding up it’s part of the picture. Who would have thought?

Cityscape

cityscape

inks, gesso, collage on w/c paper, 10 X 11″

What are we saying with the thrusting of our skyscrapers? It’s a dicey brand of supremacy. But nevertheless one which I’ve lately become intrigued with, from my vantage point in the bucolic countryside of northern California. My son, the California boy turned Manhattan based architect, has charged my imagine with structures of consciousness-bending design and detail. How can our structures reflect the designs inherent in nature so that we can live more harmoniously?  Curvy ceilings, living roofs and glass walls that bring the outside in! Oh yeah.

The art lesson here above as my favorite, inks and gesso moved around with water and a sense of adventure. The cityscape came right out of National Geographic and found the sweet spot on the page where it appeared to be either rising out of or being swallowed up by the mountain.  You pick which.