#acrylicinks

More Splatter Fun!

(Ralph Steadman inspired inks splatts continued)

I actually haven’t joined the “tidying up” frenzy of late, though I read about it all the time in jubilant Facebook posts and blogs. But clearly I’m having some kind of subconscious reaction. . .

lightenup3

splatter, spray, drip and draw acrylic inks on w/c paper

I was trying to lighten up! Look, I took everyone’s advise and tried Marie Kondo’s Japanese decluttering methods, but I may have gone a bit too far. . .and now I can’t stop. Looks like soon all I’ll be left with is my substantial snozzola.

Thinking about clearing things out for the new year? My advise is. . .take it easy!

dustbin duo

I’ll call them the Dustbin Duo. . .or maybe the Polka Dotters, or Flying Lancers or Spotted Beatle Birds, or. . .

Any more ideas?

Getting ready for lots more fun when the Muse Group arrives for a new session on Monday!

 

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Light-footed

A new Muse Group session started up last week. I’ve taken the summer off from teaching and it’s great to be back doing this intuitive painting/collaging work. I like to always start the class back up with acrylic inks because they can be squirted onto the page with droppers! Meaning that we can throw caution to the wind, at least initially, and then develop a piece with the part of the brain that embraces serendipity.

lightfootedclass demo: acrylic inks and collage on w/c paper, 10 X 11″

She is light-footed, buzzing with the bees and nesting with the birds, throwing herself out in a string of tags – one day a mother, another a star on a stage, and yet another a winged creature.

Her blessings are cast everywhere, yet she remains at the center of it all, animated and relaxed, energetic and focused. Sometimes she wraps the strings around her for protection, like shields, pulling the birds and the bees with her into a cocoon.

It can be daunting to tackle a painting like this which begins with “ink play”, so I got out my rubber stamp collection, which is considerable at this point. Some of them were purchased and many were carved into soft linoleum blocks.

The class exercise was to wet portions of the watercolor paper with water, squirt on some inks (3 colors max!) and let them mix a bit, and then add some gesso “worms” and run the roller or other tool through them to mix. I like to put some gesso of the lighter weight variety into an applicator (like a mustard container) and squeeze it onto the paper.

Then, while the paint was wet, press the rubber stamp into it and then stamp that on the paper as well. Voila! You’re already halfway to a finished painting that is harmonious and has interest!